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MOTHER TERESA

GUTTERS OF CALCUTTA

The Church in India rejoices as our beloved Mother Teresa is elevated to Sainthood on 04th September 2016. She has become a legend and symbol of Christian love and has crossed the boundaries of religion and nationalities to inspire humanity towards authentic compassion. In order to appreciate this saint, it would be fitting to know some interesting facts of Mother Teresa’s life and ministry.


Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu was born Aug. 26, 1910, in Macedonia to a financially comfortable Albanian Catholic family (they owned two houses, one of which they lived in). Her father died when she was 8, ending her family’s financial security.


Agnes was fascinated with missionaries from an early age, and by 12 she knew that she would commit herself to a religious vocation.When she was 18, Agnes left home and joined the Sisters of Loreto in Rathfarnham, Ireland. Although she lived to be 87, she never saw her mother or sister again after the day she left for Ireland. After a year of learning English in Ireland, Agnes was transferred to the Sisters of Loreto convent in Darjeeling, India. She took her vows as a nun in 1931, choosing the name Teresa to honor Saints Therese of Lisieux and Teresa of Avila. Sister Teresa began teaching history and geography in Calcutta at St Mary’s, a high school for the daughters of the wealthy. She remained there for 15 years and enjoyed the work, but was distressed by the poverty she saw all around her. People were living in the gutters.


In 1946 Teresa travelled to Darjeeling for a retreat. It was on that journey that she realized what her true calling was: “I heard the call to give up all and follow Christ into the slums to serve him among the poorest of the poor.” It took two years of preparation before she was able to begin doing the work she felt compelled to do. She needed to receive permission from the Sisters of Loreto to leave the order – while retaining her vows – as well as permission from the Archbishop of Calcutta to live and work among the poor. She herself prepared by taking a nursing course.


In 1948 Sister Teresa set aside her nun’s habit – adopting instead the simple sari and sandals worn by the women she would be living among – and moved to a small rented hovel in the slums to begin her work. Teresa’s first year in the slums was particularly hard. She was used to a life of comparative comfort, and now she had no income and no way to obtain food and supplies other than begging. She was often tempted to return to convent life, and had to rely on her determination and faith to get herself through it.


One of her first projects was to teach the children of the poor – drawing on her experience with teaching the children of the rich. She didn’t have any equipment or supplies this time, but she taught them to read and write by writing in the dirt with sticks. In addition to promoting literacy, Teresa taught the children basic hygiene. She visited their families, inquiring about their needs and helping them in whatever way she could. Word began to spread about Mother Teresa’s good works, and soon she had other volunteers wanting to help. By 1950 she was able to start the Mission of Charity – a congregation dedicated to caring for “the hungry, the naked, the homeless, the crippled, the blind, the lepers and all those people who feel unwanted, unloved, uncared for in the society, people that have become a burden to the society and are shunned by everyone.” She went on to open a hospice for the poor, a home for sufferers of leprosy, and a home for orphans and homeless youth.


Mother Teresa was honored with many awards throughout her life, from the Indian Padma Shri in 1962 to the inaugural Pope John XXIII Peace Prize in 1971 to Albania’s Golden Honour of the Nation in 1994… and, most famously, the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979. She refused the traditional Nobel honor banquet, instead requesting that the $192,000 budget be given to help the poor of India. She continued her work with the poor for the rest of her life, leading the Missionaries of Charity until just a few months before her death on Sept. 5, 1997.


The Catholic Church had begun to move Mother Teresa along the steps towards sainthood, and she was beatified in 2003. Her official title is now Blessed Teresa of Calcutta. Mother Teresa said “By blood, I am Albanian. By citizenship, an Indian but by faith, I am a Catholic nun”. By the time of her passing away to eternal life, Mother Teresa was operating 517 missions in more than 100 countries. In view of her canonization, the Archdiocese of Madras-Mylapore along with Missionaries of Charity sisters is planning to celebrate a solemn Eucharistic Celebration as Thanksgiving Mass on 9th September 2016 in Nirmala Shishu Bhavan, Royapuram. Let us prayer to St Mother Teresa to intercede for the Catholic Church especially for the Archdiocese of Madras-Mylapore.

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